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Before attempting CPR on a patient, there are several things you must do. Make sure you and the patient aren’t in any danger—if possible, resolve the risk and if not, move the patient out of harm’s way. If unable to, for whatever reason, immediately call 911.

Check the patient and see if he/she is conscious or not. Do not check for a pulse because time is of the essence and finding a pulse can take too long. Call out to the patient asking, “Are you okay?” Repeat if necessary, and if the patient doesn’t respond, immediately call 911 and then perform CPR—initiating Circulation, Airway and Breathing Tasks (the C-A-B’s) and not the A-B-C’s. Also, if possible have someone else call 911 and begin CPR, immediately.

Chest Compressions: Circulate the blood within the patient. It’s important to place your hands correctly upon the patient’s chest when performing compressions.

To do so, find the point where the patient’s ribs meet (just below both halves) and interlock your fingers with both hands. Make sure you’re kneeling beside the patient’s shoulders (Do Not Lean on Patient). Once in position, lock your elbows and use your body’s weight to compress 2 inches upon the patient’s chest. Make sure to let the patient’s chest rise after each compression. Compressions on an infant are pressed just below the nipples.

Check for any obstructions, such as the tongue, foreign objects, vomit, swelling, or food blocking the patient’s throat or windpipe (finger-swipe, if necessary).

Make sure the patient is on a solid surface (on the backside). Next, kneel next to the patient’s neck and shoulders. Open the patient’s airway by tilting the head back with the palm of one hand while gently lifting the chin with your other hand. For no more than 10 seconds, check for life: listen for any sounds, put your cheek next to the patient’s mouth to feel any breaths while also looking for any motion. Rescuers can check steps simultaneously. If the patient is assumed lifeless begin the Mouth-to-Mouth procedure Perform Chest Compressions on patients who are obese or pregnant.

Rescue Breathing: Perform mouth-to-mouth; however, it can also be performed mouth-to-nose, mouth-to-mask, and mouth-to-stoma, but in rare cases.

Breathing tasks: While still performing the Airway technique pinch the patient’s nose shut. With a complete seal over the patient’s mouth, with your mouth, breathe into the patient until you see the chest inflate. If the chest does not rise, repeat the Airway technique. When performing the breathing technique make sure to give two breaths for 1 second each.

CPR for Infants (Age Less Than 1 Year, Excluding Newborns)

Witnessed Collapse: call 911 or have someone call

Un-Witnessed Collapse: perform CPR (for 2 minutes), call 911, or have someone call

Chest compressions – 100-120/min

Perform CPR – Circulate, Airway, Breathing (C-A-B’s)

Compressions at about 1½ inches (4 cm) – 1/3 AP diameter of the chest

30:2 compressions over breaths (seal infant’s mouth and nose) –

2 Rescuers 15:2 2 Rescuers: 2 thumbs compression

Use AED as soon as it’s available

 

CPR for Children (Age 1 Year to Puberty)

Witnessed Collapse: call 911 or have someone call

Un-Witnessed Collapse: perform CPR (for 2 minutes), call 911, or have someone call

Chest compressions – 100-120/min

Perform CPR – Circulate, Airway, Breathing (C-A-B’s)

Compressions at about 2 inches (5 cm) – 1/3 AP diameter of the chest

30:2 compressions over breaths –

2 Rescuers 15:2 2 Rescuers: Perform tasks simultaneously Use AED as soon as it’s available

 

CPR for Adults & Adolescents

Check for life

Before performing CPR call 911 or have someone else call

Chest compressions – 100-120/min

2 Rescuers: Perform tasks simultaneously

Perform CPR – Circulate, Airway, Breathing (C-A-B’s)

Compressions at about 2 inches (5 cm)

1 or 2 rescuers – 30:2 compressions over breaths

Use AED as soon as it’s available

Categories: General

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